The business environment has shifted. 

People are now meeting their favorite businesses ONLINE.

If you haven’t asked yourself this before, start asking yourself this question TODAY.

What do clients see when they visit my website?

The truth is, the first time people visit your website, they are unlikely to do business with you.

Most website visitors are just “lookers.”

They are interested in your brand, but they are not ready to make a commitment. 

Rather than asking clients to marry you right away, your website should invite your client on a first date.

Something casual, like a coffee, where you can get to know each other. 

Free value opt-ins are the online business’ version of a “coffee date.” 

That lucrative “Download Free” or “Take the Quiz” button invites people to make a small first step that will solve one of their problems in exchange for their email address. 

Once you have their email, you can invite them on many more “dates” in the future.

These “dates” are your email drip campaign.

At the end of the email drip, you can ask your client to make a real commitment to your brand in the form of a sale. 

But how do you get people to opt in in the first place?

Think about it. We all know that when we give our email addresses to brands, we are consenting to be contacted by that brand.

This is a valuable piece of information. We don’t just give it out for free. 

A good way to get client emails is through a fair exchange. 

I recently found myself on a competitor’s website, just browsing around, not exactly ready to buy.

Then I saw it: a pop up in the corner of the window asking me to take a FREE quiz to figure out my content creation personality.

GENIUS. Ten minutes later, I’d reached the end of the quiz and happily handed over my email to view my results. 

You can do the same thing for your clients when they visit your website. 

What do your clients need when they visit your website?

Try to go deeper than “oh, they need xxx service.”

Yes, that’s true, but what lies under that?

Are they bored, scared, nervous, or something else?

Do they REALLY need to buy your book, or are they looking for your book because they want to make more money? 

Identify the deepest need you can and offer a free, quick solution to that need. 

If you make an offer that is going to help them meet that need, people WILL click your opt in button and give you their email address.

Once you have a solid opt-in ready to go, you’ll have to decide where you will take your new prospect out on a date. 

Make a list of your clients’ needs, and write about six emails that offer valuable information your clients can use to achieve that result. 

At Puff & Fluff Grooming and Pet Sitting, I started my email drip by making a list of the things my clients could potentially want from my brand.

Here’s an example of the list I came up with:  

  • They want their pet to be clean. 
  • They want to feel safe about leaving their pet at the groomer. 
  • They want to give their pet a great life. 
  • They want their pet to be healthy. 
  • They want to support local businesses.
  • They want to help animals in need. 

Based on this list, I would write the following emails:

  • How to keep your pet well groomed between appointments.
  • Is your pet safe at the groomer? Things to watch out for on your search. 
  • Want to make your pet’s day? Do THIS one thing! 
  • This five-point wellness check could save your pet’s life. 
  • Looking for a dog friendly spot in [place]? Look no further! 
  • Our favorite local animal rescues + how you can support them

These emails play on the same principle of a fair exchange as the opt-in.

They offer the client a valuable piece of information in exchange for them opening up the email! 

Don’t worry about selling your services in each email but do make sure you have your contact information and website in the P.S. or the signature. 

BUT WAIT—these aren’t the only emails you need to write! 

The ideal drip email length is at least eight weeks. I like to send one email per week during that time.

One of my favorite authors, Donald Miller, offered this pattern in his 2017, book Building a Storybrand, which has worked well for me: 

Email 1- Value

Email 2- Value

Email 3- Value

Email 4- CALL TO ACTION 

Email 5- Value

Email 6- Value

Email 7- Value

Email 8- CALL TO ACTION

In your call to action emails, you get to ask your client to “marry” you by purchasing services or products from your brand. To be convincing, it’s important to tell a story and make the next action completely clear. 

In this email, you should begin by relating to the BIG problem your client has. Then, address their fears. 

For example, if you know clients are concerned about price, you may point out how the investment paid off for others in their position.

If they are concerned about privacy, assure them that your services are secure. 

It is important to clearly show your clients what their outcome will be.

Once they do business with you, what will their lives be like? Show them a plan for how you will take them to that place. 

Most importantly, remember that you are NOT your client’s savior.

Avoid saying things like “I’m going to change your life.”

Instead, tell them, “I’m your friend. I care. And I’m going to HELP you make the change you want to make.” 

At the end of the email, make it crystal clear what action you want them to take.

And make sure you challenge them to take it! 

Words like “Act now!” or “Click here” followed by a link tend to do the trick. 

Once you have your freebie created and your drip emails ready to go, upload your freebie to your website, trigger your emails to auto-send, and you’ll be ready to watch your sales funnel do the work for you. 

When done right, a sales funnel will create lasting relationships that will lead clients to make the leap and purchase products or services from your brand.

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